TenantNet Forum

Where tenants can seek help and help others



C of O

Issues unrelated to specific categories below

Moderator: TenantNet

C of O

Postby Apricot » Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:02 pm

I was investigating my building on the NYC DOB web site. I noticed that while there is a Certificate of Occupancy for my building's address, in fact the CofO covers two addresses (one which doesn't exist as far as I know) and the description of the building is for the one next door. I contacted the DOB and was told there is no CofA. The building was built before 1910. The building next door (the one which the CofA describes) is much later.

Is this situation common? What happens if the building owner creates a new apartment in the building (thus changing the apartment count)? Are CofAs a new(er) thing?

Would someone have the name/email address of a professor in NYC area who studies the DOB and its history and practices?

Thanks.
Apricot
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:54 pm

Re: C of O

Postby TenantNet » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:17 pm

Old buildings that have been demolished? Sure, that's common. Better to investigate using the Block and Lot number system. All buildings are on a lot ... and a lot might contain more than one building.

Addresses, usually set by Dept. of City Planning (DCP) can often be a range, i.e., 709-715 Fifth Ave. (I don't know if that exists, but that's how you often see things).

Buildings constructed prior to 1939 are not required to have a CofO unless there were renovations or alterations that triggered the requirement. A change of use would trigger that. For example, if a LL put in a laundry room in a basement that previously was mechanical and storage, that's a change of use and requires a CofO.
The Tenant Network(tm) for Residential Tenants
Information from TenantNet is from experienced non-attorney tenant
activists and is not considered legal advice.

Subscribe to our Twitter Feed @TenantNet
TenantNet
 
Posts: 8664
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2002 2:01 am
Location: New York City

Re: C of O

Postby Apricot » Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:24 am

I hope I didn't mentioned demolished. My building was not demolished. Using the block and lot numbers got me to the same documents. Several CofOs from the same year with the same information (or less). Nothing at all about my building.

Is there any other location for historical data on buildings in NYC such as I am looking for?

Thanks for your help!
Apricot
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:54 pm

Re: C of O

Postby TenantNet » Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:18 am

I meant the building that was on the lot BEFORE your building. Documents from that building are likely to still be on file.

Google "how to research buildings in NYC" ... look for "christopher gray NY times" - he used to write for the NY Times and had several columns on how to research.
The Tenant Network(tm) for Residential Tenants
Information from TenantNet is from experienced non-attorney tenant
activists and is not considered legal advice.

Subscribe to our Twitter Feed @TenantNet
TenantNet
 
Posts: 8664
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2002 2:01 am
Location: New York City

Re: C of O

Postby Apricot » Fri Feb 23, 2018 11:23 pm

My building was built in about 1903. Thanks for the info about Christopher Gray.
Apricot
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:54 pm

Re: C of O

Postby TenantNet » Fri Feb 23, 2018 11:59 pm

Forgot to mention, he passed away about a year ago. But you can still find his columns on the NY Times web site.

Also if you can get access, one great source is the Avery Architectural Library at Columbia.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avery_Arc ... ts_Library
The Tenant Network(tm) for Residential Tenants
Information from TenantNet is from experienced non-attorney tenant
activists and is not considered legal advice.

Subscribe to our Twitter Feed @TenantNet
TenantNet
 
Posts: 8664
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2002 2:01 am
Location: New York City


Return to NYC General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest