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Part Two

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Part Two

Postby JulieA » Sun Sep 29, 2002 1:31 am

How does someone with good non-9-5 income, but who has lost all her savings, and whose credit is not perfect because she was overwhelmed with bills and got behind on her student loan--how does she get an apartment?

I'm in a place that makes me unhappy right now, and I don't want to renew the lease. I would realy like to buy a place, but I have no down payment. I'd be happy just to rent a place in a nice neighborhood otherwise.

What are my choices, a miserable apartment or homelessness?

With the strict selection process now, I'm surprised there are not more homeless people. Why was it so easy to get an apartment 10, 15 years ago?

I have to admit it makes me angry because it makes me feel trapped. What's the solution for me?

The fact of the matter is, I have been renting in New York for a while, and paying my rent on time. Isn't that good enough? I've been in this place for 2 years, and have been a good tenant.

Yet I cringe at the thought of going through the whole application process and having to deal with not being "conventional", and explaining it in detail.

It's like, look I have this pretty high income, it's secure, I've always been a good tenant, and I'm presentable and professional. But like everyone, I'm not perfect. I don't have perfect credit, and I once took a landlord to court 7 years ago because I had a boyfriend who lived with me and he was the one who insisted on it, but it's on MY record.

(He also depleted all my savings, but that's another story).

Any ideas? I'm in the dark here.
JulieA
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2002 1:01 am
Location: NewYork

Re: Part Two

Postby JulieA » Sun Sep 29, 2002 2:50 pm

Helloooo, if I've always paid my rent on time, isn't that the most important thing? That's my good credit.

I don't mean to be sarcastic, but DUH! Your history as a good tenant is what counts!
JulieA
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2002 1:01 am
Location: NewYork

Re: Part Two

Postby JulieA » Sun Sep 29, 2002 7:38 pm

It really comes down to how competitive the market is I suppose.

Yet, wasn't the market competitive in, say, 1985? Back then there was no credit check. The most they did was call your employer to make sure you had a job.

It was eeeasy to get an apartment then. No lengthy paperwork, just one application form on which you put your income, source of income and a reference or two.

So has life become harder instead of easier because of a more competitive marketplace, or...?
JulieA
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2002 1:01 am
Location: NewYork

Re: Part Two

Postby JulieA » Sun Sep 29, 2002 7:57 pm

<<<but in any case, julie...be honest...if u were a landlord, who would u pick, a person who only had two years of good credit or someone with 7?... >>>

To be honest? I'd look at each prospective tenant as an individual, not as a credit rating. But then we get back to the competitive market. If you have hundreds vying for the same apartment, I can undersatnd then that a landlord has no time to consider the individual.

I had thought things had slowed down in the past year, as prices have gone down. Now my rent is higher then market value, although it wasn't amazingly cheap to begin with.
JulieA
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2002 1:01 am
Location: NewYork


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