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standard lease form?

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standard lease form?

Postby ctny » Thu Dec 29, 2011 2:50 am

I remember all the leases I had before used to say something kind of official, like "New York State standard form xxx" on the top and bottom... I looked at my current lease recently and noticed it didn't say that. It contains pretty legal sounding stuff but looked like just a word document and without the phrases I used to see.

Is there a requirement for LL to use a state approved standard form? I don't have the previous leases now, is there a place where I can download the standard form and compare with my current lease?
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Postby Cranky Tenant » Sat Dec 31, 2011 1:38 am

Is your apartment rent stabilized?
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Postby ctny » Sat Dec 31, 2011 12:10 pm

No, it is just a regular rental with 1yr lease from a LL who owns a single apartment in a building.
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Postby Cranky Tenant » Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:51 pm

Then there's no requirement in terms of lease. In fact the landlord isn't even required to give you a formal lease. Or he can decide not to renew your lease when the current one is up. If you were to go to court there might be a question of whether or not some of the terms of the lease are enforceable. Sometimes leases state "Standard Lease" or "Rent Stabilized Lease" but that isn't a legal requirement.

However, if the apartment is a co-op or condo, located in an apartment building, it could come under rent stabilization even if it's the only apartment owned by that individual.
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Postby ronin » Thu Jan 05, 2012 12:57 am

The fact that your old leases had what sounds like Rent Stabilization language on them suggests that you may actually be in a rent stabilized apartment.

You should get your old leases out and check them to see if they mention the legal rent for the unit and "allowable increases". Then go down to the DHCR and look up your unit. (As TN likes to say, units are stabilized, not buildings).
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